How are men’s and women’s dental needs different?

Who brushes better?

In the battle of the sexes, is there a winner when it comes to oral health? Let's take a look at some of the key differences in dental care between men and women. 

1. Women have different oral issues at different life stages

Women can experience sudden changes in oral health as they go through pregnancy or menopause. The changes in hormones can affect women's oral health, so pregnancy gingivitis is fairly common. 

During menopause, women may notice symptoms such as Burning Mouth Syndrome, which doesn't pose a risk to oral health but is frustrating. Women also become more at risk of periodontal disease after menopause due to changes in estrogen levels. Regular dental check ups and vigilance with brushing and flossing are important for keeping any problems in check at these stages of a woman's life. 

Pregnant women go through hormonal changes that affect their oral health, so they should be vigilant of dental problems. Pregnant women go through hormonal changes that affect their oral health, so they should be vigilant of dental problems.

2. Men can experience more mouth trauma

In general, men play more contact sports than women, such as rugby or boxing. These sports can put them at a higher risk of chipping, cracking or losing a tooth. To help protect their teeth, both men and women playing these kinds of sports should wear a mouthguard. 

Men's lifestyles may mean they are exposed to more mouth trauma. Men's lifestyles may mean they are exposed to more mouth trauma.

3. Women are more proactive about their oral health

86 per cent of women brush their teeth twice daily. 

Research published in the Journal of Periodontology show that women take a more proactive approach to their dental health. The study showed that women are 26 per cent more likely to floss regularly and are almost twice as likely to schedule regular check ups. According to Colgate, 86 per cent of women brush their teeth twice daily, but only 66 per cent of men brush both morning and night. Men also reportedly change their toothbrushes less often.

Women's diligence with oral care clearly pays off – as well as having a better understanding of oral health, women were also more likely to have lower instances of plaque and bleeding gums. 

At the end of the day, both men and women need expert dental care to make sure their teeth and gums stay healthy. That's where we come in – we are here to take the very best care of you and your whole family. Reach out to us today for more information or make an appointment online